Saturday, April 12, 2014


¡Qué horror! 2014
Candidate #7

GEUNG SI
(RIGOR MORTIS)
(August 2013)


Juno Mak's feature debut is an impressive feat: it’s a phantasmagorical tour of Chinese superstition and religion that’s also a loving (and semi-meta) homage to the Jiangshi films of the ‘80’s.

And it pays this rather noteworthy tribute by stripping away the comedic wackiness of the original Jiangshi films and delivering an atmospheric tale of blood and shadows and death.


Co-produced by Ju-on mastermind, Shimizu Takashi, Geung Si manages to rope in even a non-Jiangshi film fan like myself (those who know me well know that the wacky schtick is so not my thing) with the aforementioned phantasmagoria and atmosphere and the straight-faced, straightforward approach to the narrative.
The fact that I was not a particular fan of Jiangshi also meant that the meta leanings of Geung Si pretty much flew right over my head, but even missing out on that aspect during my first viewing did not diminish my amazement at the film.

Playing out like a wild and creepy mash-up of Asian horror and wuxia, I highly recommend this, especially for those KADASIG readers who’ve ever wondered what a film adaptation would look like.
For my money, it would look something like Geung Si


(Geung Si/Rigor Mortis OS’ and Character Poster courtesy of thedailyzombies.com.)

PIMP MY STUFF
NEW 'VERSE TITLES AT FILBAR'S

Firstly, all my mighty fine artist collaborators and I would like to thank all the mighty fine folk who dropped by the table at yesterday’s Summer Kon to pick up some comics (and some SEROKS from the Visprint table) and to have stuff signed and to exchange some encouraging and heartening words of support.

To all of you, our heartfelt gratitude…

For any of you who weren’t able to drop by the Bayanihan Center yesterday though, these new ‘Verse titles should be available at Filbar’s (Megamall and Festival Mall branches, I believe) soon…



DAKILA: Buwan
Issue 1 (of 3)
By David Hontiveros and Jason Confesor

18-year old Brandon Ramirez has been a superhero for almost 3 months now, and as if things weren’t complicated enough, he’s gone and fallen in love… with a lunar princess… who’s got a jealous childhood friend who happens to be a demon-werewolf hybrid, and who’s just decided to turn up the crazy in time for a really important dinner date!

Dakila. 18 years old. Cosmic champion.
All of a sudden, acne and getting a driver’s license are so not a big deal.


URIEL: Hekhalot
Issue 2B (of 4)
By David Hontiveros and Michael Urbano

Uriel is a mighty arel, held in reverence and awe by his fellow arelim, feared and despised by the shedim hordes.
And right now, his fate and existence lies in the hands of his seven-year-old mortal charge, Maleck de los Santos.

Uriel journeys to the diabul in an attempt to find a solution to his current problem: he must now find a way to leave Maleck’s body without harming the boy.
Meanwhile, Maleck’s doctor is sucked into the supernatural goings-on surrounding his young patient…


(URIEL: Hekhalot Issue 2A will also be available at Filbar’s.)

Again, thanx to one and all.


you can’t drink just six,

Dave

Thursday, April 3, 2014

PIMP MY STUFF
APRIL 12 2014 SUMMER KOMIKON

For all you mighty fine folk who plan to be at the Bayanihan Center next Saturday, April 12, for this year’s Summer Kon, these are the new ‘Verse titles that are launching:



DAKILA: Buwan
Issue 1 (of 3)
By David Hontiveros and Jason Confesor
P110.00

18-year old Brandon Ramirez has been a superhero for almost 3 months now, and as if things weren’t complicated enough, he’s gone and fallen in love… with a lunar princess… who’s got a jealous childhood friend who happens to be a demon-werewolf hybrid, and who’s just decided to turn up the crazy in time for a really important dinner date!

Dakila. 18 years old. Cosmic champion.
All of a sudden, acne and getting a driver’s license are so not a big deal.


URIEL: Hekhalot
Issue 2B (of 4)
By David Hontiveros and Michael Urbano
P50.00

Uriel is a mighty arel, held in reverence and awe by his fellow arelim, feared and despised by the shedim hordes.
And right now, his fate and existence lies in the hands of his seven-year-old mortal charge, Maleck de los Santos.

Uriel journeys to the diabul in an attempt to find a solution to his current problem: he must now find a way to leave Maleck’s body without harming the boy.
Meanwhile, Maleck’s doctor is sucked into the supernatural goings-on surrounding his young patient…

PLUS!

This baby should also be available at the Visprint table…
 

SEROKS Iteration 2: Once in a Lifetime
By David Hontiveros; illustrations by Alan Navarra

Return to the dystopic future world of SEROKS Iteration 1: Mirror Man in Once in a Lifetime.
Here, we meet two more of the 8 seroks of the world’s first superhero, Paladin, engineered from the DNA of popular yesteryear movie star-slash-disgraced ex-Philippine President Federico Rubio.
And find out more about the ones we’ve already met.

Plus, there’s also the world’s second superhero, Paladin, Jr., an enhanced clone of the tragically deceased movie star Taylor Kon, who’s teamed up with the first Paladin.

All that, and the rest of our SEROKS cast--Originals, Templates, or dupes--who are joined by some new faces, some familiar-looking, some not, and some, not even human.

So, while I’m uncertain as to the current status of Once in a Lifetime as far as the local bookstores are concerned--not sure when it’s gonna be stocked on shelves--it’s a safe bet copies will be available at Summer Kon.

So there we go.
Hope to see all you mighty fine folk at the Bayanihan Center next Saturday (April 12) for this year’s Summer Kon hijinx!

you can’t drink just six,

Dave

Thursday, March 20, 2014


¡Qué horror! 2014
Candidate #6

CHEAP THRILLS
(March 2013)


Old friends Craig (Pat Healy) and Vince (Ethan Embry) haven’t seen each other for five years, and a chance meeting with Colin (David Koechner) and his wife, birthday girl Violet (Healy’s The Innkeepers co-star Sara Paxton) opens them up to the opportunity (and a night) of a lifetime…

This feature debut of E.L Katz, co-written by Deadgirl scribe Trent Haaga with David Chirchirillo, is currently in the running for the most disturbing entry amongst this year’s ¡Q horror! crop thus far, and that’s saying something.
It’s got some streaks of black humor running through it, but ultimately, it’s a potent portrait of just how petty and cruel individuals can be in the light of monetary reward; it’s about the horror of how far desperate people will debase themselves for some cold hard cash.


Parting Shot: A review of past ¡Q horror! title, Deadgirl, can be found lurking in the Archive.

(Cheap Thrills OS’ courtesy of impawards.com)

Friday, March 7, 2014

PIMP MY STUFF
SEROKS ITERATION 2: ONCE IN A LIFETIME


All right, the time is almost upon us...

I’ve been informed that SEROKS Iteration 2: Once in a Lifetime is currently in the process of actualization (i.e. it’s at press even as I type this).

SEROKS Iteration 2: Once in a Lifetime follows the original SEROKS Iteration 1: Mirror Man.
It, like its predecessor, is a collection of short stories set in the dystopic future world I first visited in the Palanca Award-winning “Kaming Mga Seroks.”
As with the first Iteration, the stories are by yours truly, with accompanying illustrations by the mighty fine Alan Navarra, all brought to us by the Visprint crew.

Keep your ears tuned for another announcement when the book’s ready for dissemination and it becomes available in bookstores across this grand nation of ours…

Huzzah!


Plus, if you have yet to pick it up, please check out SEROKS Iteration 1: Mirror Man at those aforementioned bookstores... 


(SEROKS Iteration 2: Once in a Lifetime Front and Back Covers and SEROKS Iteration 1: Mirror Man Front Cover by Alan Navarra; the Iteration 2 images are the original files Alan sent me, so I imagine they may look slightly different in the final print.)

Saturday, December 21, 2013


¡Qué horror! 2014
Candidate #5

WE ARE WHAT WE ARE
(January 2013) 


After having given us Mulberry Street and Stake Land, the dynamic duo of Nick Damici and Jim Mickle--as co-writers, with Mickle in the directorial chair--take on an English-language remake of Jorge Michel Grau’s Somos Lo Que Hay. 
Now, while I was not as enamored of Somos Lo Que Hay as others, I was floored by Mickle and Damici’s take on the material, producing what is, undoubtedly, the best film they’ve crafted thus far.
To call it a remake would quite possibly be misleading though, as it does a whole lot more than simply transplant the narrative from Mexico to the Catskills, but rather, it essentially just takes the core idea (a family of cannibals trying to exist in contemporary society) and then deviates significantly from the original.


Mickle and Damici’s We Are What We Are is an excellently measured piece that takes a look at the collision of religion, tradition, and the always complex and complicated bonds of family, as triggered by the devastating effects of a torrential storm.
It’s a tortured family drama dressed up in one of Buffalo Bill’s cast-off “suits”; there’s the inherent and underlying gruesomeness of the idea that wraps around it, but what really matters is what’s beneath it--the troubled, beating heart of family.

There’s an excellent cast here, which includes Michael Parks, Bill Sage, Wyatt Russell (son of Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn) and Stake Land alumna Kelly McGillis, with a brief appearance by Larry Fessenden (yay!).
The central performances that need to be highlighted though, are those by Martha Marcy May Marlene’s Julia Garner and Ambyr Childers, who bring a haunted, wan translucency to the Parker girls, poor unfortunates burdened with the responsibilities of tradition that they may not want in the first place.

 “It’s a family drama with horrific backdrop. But I don’t think of it as a horror movie, and I hate that we have to classify things or put things in specific genres in order for it to be seen as something. So for marketing purposes, I hope people see it as a horror film and then when they see it go, ‘That wasn’t really a horror movie.’”
--Jim Mickle

Parting Shot: What’s interesting in the wake of We Are What We Are are the discussions for a prequel and a sequel, the latter to be handled by Jorge Michel Grau.
Now that sounds, errr… yummy…

(We Are What We Are OS courtesy of impawards.com.)


¡Qué horror! 2014
Candidate #4

FORGETTING THE GIRL
(March 2012)


“Nicole. She’s the one girl I keep trying to remember. But I… I think she’s the problem. I think she’s the reason I am the way I am, right?

Christopher Denham (from Sound of My Voice and ¡Q horror! 2013 title The Bay) is photographer Kevin Wolfe, a man desperate for some sort of genuine human connection with the opposite sex, but who may very well be his own worst enemy, as a traumatic past could prove to be the reason for his constant failure at relationships.

With Denham also acting as co-producer, Forgetting the Girl is director Nate Taylor’s impressive feature debut. Working from a screenplay by Peter Moore Smith, Taylor gives us a well-crafted exercise in measured suspense, as Kevin goes about his life, and we begin to see just how dysfunctional it actually is.

Forgetting the Girl is an exceedingly commendable freshman feature effort from Taylor that is about, among other things, memory (and the lengths we go to eradicate the possible pain they may contain) and the madnesses we enable within each other.

Parting Shot 1: Props for the use of VNV Nation’s haunting “Illusion” over the end credits roll.

Parting Shot 2: A review of The Bay lurks in the Archive.

(Forgetting the Girl OS courtesy of impawards.com.)